It’s more than a news headline – This could change everything.

I know this is a long post, but if you’ve got a few minutes, I hope you’ll read and continue your support of my family and others like ours. The more you know!

The Orphan Drug Act (ODA) passed in the US in 1983. Its purpose was to encourage drug companies to research and develop therapies for those with rare diseases. Why is it called “orphan”? Because, rare disease therapies generally lack sponsors to develop them. The market is small, research is expensive, and there is very little return on investment. There are over 30 million Americans suffering from over 7,000 rare conditions. Only 5% of those diseases have an approved treatment. Which means, the majority of those suffering have no treatment options at all. Taking your loved one home and being told to “make the best of the time they have left”, is a very real reality for many. Being granted an orphan drug designation by the #FDA, manufacturers and sponsors receive a 50% tax credit on qualified clinical testing, there are also several grants available. Which in turn helps recover development costs. According to the FDA, in the decade before the ODA was passed, only 10 treatments had been developed for rare diseases. That’s not a typo, TEN. This incentive, since inception, has helped bring nearly 500 new medications to patients. It has a proven track record of success.

Today, the House passed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. The Senate will vote after Thanksgiving. Included in this bill is the proposal to repeal or weaken the Orphan Drug Tax Credit. This is one of the only credits that is proven to save lives. I’m asking that you consider joining the #raredisease community in fighting to ensure it will not be weakened or repealed as part of the tax reform.

How can you help? Follow the link below. At the bottom of the form you will enter your address and zip code. A letter to your senators and representative will be filled out for you. The letter asks your representatives to oppose repeal or weakening of the Orphan Drug Tax Credit. All you need to do is enter your name, home address, email address and hit submit. It’s really that easy. I hope you’ll consider doing it.

https://salsa3.salsalabs.com/…/p/dia/action4/common/public/…

As always, thank you so much for the support. xoxo

#themoreyouknow #wehaveHIhopes #hyperinsulinism #orphandrugs #taxreform

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Sugar Bugs

Lancets and Test StripsThey say a picture is worth a thousand words, but looking at this picture, I could tell you THOUSANDS. These are lancets and test strips from our sharps container at home. These are all from glucose checks and not even half of what we’ve used over the last few months.

To me, these are hundreds of pokes on the sweetest baby toes you’ve ever seen. These are scared moments when his sugar has dropped too low. These are late nights and early mornings awoken by his crying. These are calibrations on his CGM. Testing how new foods affected his sugar. These are from moments when he was throwing up and we didn’t know how long we had before he’d become hypo, when we were checking every 30 minutes (or less), all while rushing in Houston traffic trying to get to the Texas Medical Center. But, mostly, thankfully, these were our reassurance that he was okay. This is what our lives have revolved around for the last nine months.

wehavehihopes toesThis is us checking for “Sugar Bugs” – no idea why we started calling it that but at some point, one of us said it and it stuck. How many sugar bugs are we going to find? Let’s catch lots and lots of them! Yay!!! We found 92! Seems kind of silly but we are trying to make it a positive and fun experience. He doesn’t cry anymore when the lancet pierces his skin or wake up when we poke him at night. His big toes are so callused that sometimes getting a small drop of blood is a challenge. I remember when we first started this journey, his poor toes became so beat up and turned red with bruises.

Now, here we are, just days away from the start of our “Cure Fast” at Texas Children’s. I am so anxious. We’ve slowly reduced his Diazoxide intake. He’s gone from 9.54mg/kg to 8.18mg/kg. So far he’s doing really well. He’s had a few numbers near 70 but for the most part, he’s hanging out in the 120 range. I pray that this is a good sign. I’m scared to be disappointed because no matter how many times I tell myself “Don’t get your hopes up”, they’re up. After all, I am a mom with HI Hopes. It’s who I am. I want this so bad for him, for us. The next two weeks, I suspect will be a roller coaster of emotions but I want to know. It’s the not knowing that has me feeling so crazy. If he has to live with HI longer, or even the rest of his life, we’re going to manage, I know that, but I really pray he doesn’t have to.

My hopes are that one day the words that come to mind when I look at that pile of lancets and strips are in past tense. That they become things that we used to have to do. Distant memories as a life free of hyperinsulinsm start making new ones in our lives. How sweet that life could be. I don’t know if that’s what’s in the future for us but I’m holding that dream close to my heart and never letting go.

Dr. Jason Goldberg, UTMB

Dr. Goldberg is a “HI Achiever” that was thrown into the HI world by chance – A perfect storm that brought he and Jackson together. Perhaps some sort of divine intervention.

As you know, Texas Children’s Hospital has been instrumental in the diagnosis and treatment of Jackson’s Hyperinsulinism but our journey started before we landed on their doorstep. With me sitting in Dr. Goldberg’s office, scared, and desperate for help. Not knowing that the new doctor we had to see by default, would become the one to help save his life.

When Jackson had his first seizure and starting acting abnormal, we went to our local emergency room. There, the attending doctor dismissed us.  I now know this happens all of the time with these kids. No one looks at a baby and thinks “I wonder if they are hypoglycemic?”. This doctor made me question my own judgement and made me feel like I was overreacting.  He told me “babies do this all of the time when they’re teething, it’s completely normal”. He even laughed off our concerns. We had such a large age gap between kids it was understandable that we’d be quick to jump the gun. I regret taking his words to heart because Jackson continued to suffer. I became too unsure of myself to get an immediate second opinion. Each day, nothing changed. His temperature was cold, he would zone out, I couldn’t get his attention, he had no energy, and he stopped crying for food. After three more days of this, enough was enough. I needed another opinion.

I called to make a same day appointment with our pediatrician. She was out of the office so we took the first available with Dr. Jason Goldberg, he’s with University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB). I’ll be honest, I was a little disappointed to have to go to someone we’d never been to before but in that moment, I had to take what we could get. I trusted the pediatrician’s office, I just wasn’t in the mood to deal with someone new. As I was headed to the appointment, I knew I wouldn’t be able to leave without answers. I couldn’t have another doctor dismiss me. I needed someone to listen. We needed help. I had never met Dr. Goldberg before but I went in feeling like I was ready for a battle. Hopefully, I didn’t scare him. In our talks since then, I know I made an impression. He’ll tell you, I was in momma bear mode.

Dr. Goldberg walked in our exam room and introduced himself. Without missing a beat and not giving him time to get another word out, I pounced. Looked him dead in his eyes, more desperate than I have ever been, and said “Something is wrong with my son. Don’t tell me I’m overreacting, I have common sense and I am not going to be dismissed. My son needs help”. As straight forward and slightly rude as I was, he said “Ok. You know him better than anyone. You tell me something’s wrong, then something must be wrong. Start from the beginning”. So I did. I could see it in his eyes, he too knew something wasn’t right. This wasn’t normal. He and I both suspected something neurological may be happening. He told me to get in my car and head straight to Texas Children’s. He said “If they won’t see him, call me, if I have to keep this office open late and get a specialist here, I will do it. Whatever we have to do, we’ll do it. We’ll figure this out”. I took Jackson and we headed straight to TCH, and you know how that story goes. We arrived with his blood sugar at 21, likely moments away from brain damage or possibly death. We arrived just in time.

Dr. Goldberg continued to follow Jackson through a shared system UTMB and Texas Children’s have. He even called us a few times during our three week stay, just to see how we were, if there was anything that he could do to help. See, he’s not just a good doctor, he’s a good person.

Once we were ready for our discharge at TCH, we were told to make thing simpler, we should switch Jackson’s primary care to a TCH doctor. Keep all of his healthcare within one system. That may have made things more transparent but Dr. Goldberg helped save his life. We weren’t going anywhere. We were staying with UTMB, we were staying with Dr. Goldberg. He is the best pediatrician to treat Jackson.

Dr. Goldberg has gone on to research hyperinsulinism, diazoxide, and be as prepared as possible to help keep Jackson healthy and to make educated decisions. He’s done everything he can to make the transition between both systems seamless and no matter how busy he is, he never rushes us. He always looks at the whole picture. He researches. He asks questions. He cares about my son. He cares about my family. I really couldn’t ask for anything more.

There aren’t many doctors like him and we could never repay him for all he’s done to keep Jackson safe and healthy or the sanity he’s given me on my rough days, when I show up in his office stressed, scared, tired, overwhelmed, or even in tears. Dr. Goldberg is who you’d want in charge of your child’s health. My rare kid, has a rare doctor. We’re pretty lucky.