“Not Medically Necessary”

I really have a love/heat relationship with our insurance provider. We have private insurance through my husband’s employer and trust me, without it, we’d be well over $750K in debt. So in many ways, I am so thankful for it but it’s not free. With premiums, deductibles, and maximum out of pocket, we’re drowning. So when we get the dreaded package in the mail, informing us that “This claim is denied. After our review it has been determined this procedure was not medically necessary.” – It takes the wind out of our sails. Denied

Last month, Jackson needed tubes put in his ears. This is a very basic and common procedure that literally takes 15 minutes. Not a big deal, right? Well for someone who has Congenital Hyperinsulinism, it’s not that simple. The procedure requires general anesthesia (being put to sleep), which requires the patient to fast (not eat) starting at midnight before the procedure. There lies the problem. Individuals with HI, typically, can not fast for long periods of time. The nature of their disease requires carbs because they are constantly hypoglycemic. Jackson needs to eat every 2.5 – 3 hours, even over night.

17492832_10155042694115502_762686812060261926_oWorking with the Texas Children’s Hospital ENT and Endo departments – Jackson was admitted to TCH the night before the procedure. He ate a nice healthy dinner and then was put on a dextrose (sugar) drip. His blood sugar remained stable and for the first time in his life, he slept for nearly eight hours straight! He was stable enough for surgery and everything went off without a hitch.  We were discharged within 45 minutes of the surgery. The stay and surgery were a success!

This week, the dreaded thick envelope arrived from the insurance company and we now know that means it’s an EOB (explanation of benefits) along with an appeals package. Each time that thick envelope arrives, we know something else has been denied. I have appealed before and it’s not that I “can’t” do it. It’s that I shouldn’t have to fight with them when they have access to all of his medical records. It’s exhausting sending the same information, time and time again but I will, and the new fight begins and the fear of assuming $4,000 of additional debt hangs over our heads.

Life Can Sure be Sweet

Our lives aren’t easy on most days. Five hospitalizations in the last few months have left us stressed, scared, and overwhelmed. Yet we are stopping to enjoy the sweetness in our lives. Jackson is about to be one year old!

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In the last year we’ve learned so much and met some of the most amazing people.We’ve seen our family and friends rally around us, we’ve learned to advocate, we’ve seen our older child grow and mature in her fight for her brother, and we’ve seen our “Sugar Baby” become a hero right before our eyes. No, it’s not always easy but life can sure be sweet.

Jackson has been mostly stable. A few scares here and there when his sugar drops for no apparent reason and we fight to get it back up, but I’m happy to say that has become the exception rather than the rule.

He’ll be readmitted in the next few weeks for our first Safety Fast since diagnosis. Our goal will be to fast him on Diazoxide alone to see how long he can go without eating. This isn’t a full proof method but this is one of the only tests we can do to gauge if he’s getting any better, worse, needs an increase in medication, and how long we have if he’s unable to eat before things take a dangerous turn for the worse.

So many things can affect your blood sugar; illness, pain, outside temperature, level of energy burned, to name a few. So how he responds in the hospital may not be how he responds in a “real life” scenario but it’ll give us a starting point.